The Daily Caller

The Daily Caller
U.S. Senator Barbara Mikulski (D-MD) boards the subway to the senate office buildings at the U.S. Capitol in Washington, January 15, 2014. The U.S. Senate overwhelmingly approved a three-day funding extension that will stave off a government shutdown at midnight on Wednesday and buy extra time to pass a $1.1 trillion spending bill for fiscal 2014.  REUTERS/Jonathan Ernst    (UNITED STATES - Tags: POLITICS) - RTX17FEV U.S. Senator Barbara Mikulski (D-MD) boards the subway to the senate office buildings at the U.S. Capitol in Washington, January 15, 2014. The U.S. Senate overwhelmingly approved a three-day funding extension that will stave off a government shutdown at midnight on Wednesday and buy extra time to pass a $1.1 trillion spending bill for fiscal 2014. REUTERS/Jonathan Ernst (UNITED STATES - Tags: POLITICS) - RTX17FEV  

Congress easily votes to not shut down the government

The government will not shut down at midnight, thanks to efforts by both chambers of Congress in passing a short-term government funding resolution that will keep the lights on through Saturday.

On Wednesday, the Senate passed a short-term funding bill 86-14. The House passed the bill on Tuesday by voice vote. Those actions successfully averted another government shutdown like the one in October, when the two chambers locked horns over a bill to fund the government, resulting in a 16-day partial shutdown and increased negative sentiment toward Congress.

This time around, there was little to no resistance to passing the funding bill.

The short-term funding resolution buys both chambers time to debate and pass the 1,582 page omnibus budget bill that has been hammered out by the appropriations committees in each chamber. The House passed that bill Wednesday afternoon.

In the Senate, several Republicans have objected to the bill; in particular, to the timeline, arguing that that there is no way members can be fully acquainted with the contents of such a lengthy bill when it was released on Monday evening and must be voted on by Saturday.

“The House will vote on the omnibus as little as 46 hours after receiving it. Could you read this thing that quickly?” asked the Senate Budget Committee Republicans on Twitter on Tuesday.

 

Other Senate Republicans have objected to the top-line number and the contents of the omnibus bill.

“Today’s vote on the Continuing Resolution moves us one step closer to the 1,500-page, $1 trillion omnibus bill that does nothing to restore economic growth, stop Obamacare, or fix our spending problem,” said Texas Sen. Ted Cruz, one of the 14 no votes on the short-term funding bill. “If anyone wants to know why the nation is in fiscal trouble, look no further than the massive omnibus bill being jammed through Congress currently.”

Still, the omnibus bill is expected to pass.

All 14 no votes on the short-term funding bill came from Republicans: Sens. John Barrasso of Wyoming, Tom Coburn of Oklahoma, Mike Crapo of Idaho, Ted Cruz of Texas, Mike Enzi of Wyoming, Dean Heller of Nevada, Jim Inhofe of Oklahoma, Mike Lee of Utah, Ron Paul of Kentucky, Jim Risch of Idaho, Pat Roberts of Kansas, Marco Rubio of Florida, Tim Scott of South Carolina, and David Vitter of Louisiana.

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