Politics
Dzhokhar Tsarnaev/FBI, Mohamad Atta/FBI, Osama bin Laden/Getty Images, Richard Reid/public domain, Nidal Hasan/public domain Dzhokhar Tsarnaev/FBI, Mohamad Atta/FBI, Osama bin Laden/Getty Images, Richard Reid/public domain, Nidal Hasan/public domain  

White House asks American parents to monitor their children for signs of terrorism

In a speech earlier this week, Lisa O. Monaco, President Barack Obama’s assistant for homeland security and counterterrorism, insisted that American parents must be vigilant because their “confrontational” children could be on the verge of becoming terrorists.

Monaco’s full, prepared text is available here. She presented the speech, entitled “Countering Violent Extremism and the Power of Community,” at Harvard University’s Kennedy School of Government on April 15.

Monaco began her remarks by eloquently describing the lives tragically lost last year during the Boston Marathon bombings. Interestingly, the Harvard grad failed to mention the religion or the motive of brothers Dzhokhar and Tamerlan Tsarnaev, the Muslim terrorists behind the Boston bombings.

In the very next paragraph, Monaco specifically noted racist and disgustingly anti-Semitic beliefs of Frazier Glenn Miller, the 73-year-old former Ku Klux Klan leader accused of gunning down three people at a Jewish Community Center in Kansas last Sunday. (RELATED: Guess what college the Jewish Community Center shooter lectured at)

The White House bureaucrat then settled into the heart of her speech: That Obama “has been laser-focused” on preventing “violent extremism” “by homegrown violent extremists” right here “in the United States.”

The president can’t do it all, though. He needs “local communities” to assist in observing “warning signs a person” is becoming “radicalized to violence.”

This is where the American parents of American children in America’s towns, cities and countryside can provide the greatest assistance, Monaco said.

“For instance, parents might see sudden personality changes in their children at home—becoming confrontational,” she asserted.

Schoolteachers and community members can help as well.

“Teachers might hear a student expressing an interest in traveling to a conflict zone overseas,” she added—in an ambiguous allusion to various religious conflicts around the world.

“Or friends might notice a new interest in watching or sharing violent material.”

Monaco then went on to explain some of the localized initiatives that various government entities have initiated to thwart terrorist activities in the United States.

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