Tech
Facebook website pages opened in an internet browser is seen in this photo illustration taken in Lavigny May 16, 2012. Facebook Inc increased the size of its initial public offering by almost 25 percent, and could raise as much as $16 billion as strong investor demand for a share of the No.1 social network trumps debate about its long-term potential to make money. Facebook, founded eight years ago by Mark Zuckerberg in a Harvard dorm room, said on Wednesday it will add about 84 million shares to its IPO, floating about 421 million shares in an offering expected to be priced on Thursday. REUTERS/Valentin Flauraud (SWITZERLAND - Tags: BUSINESS SCIENCE TECHNOLOGY SOCIETY) - RTR325LN Facebook website pages opened in an internet browser is seen in this photo illustration taken in Lavigny May 16, 2012. Facebook Inc increased the size of its initial public offering by almost 25 percent, and could raise as much as $16 billion as strong investor demand for a share of the No.1 social network trumps debate about its long-term potential to make money. Facebook, founded eight years ago by Mark Zuckerberg in a Harvard dorm room, said on Wednesday it will add about 84 million shares to its IPO, floating about 421 million shares in an offering expected to be priced on Thursday. REUTERS/Valentin Flauraud (SWITZERLAND - Tags: BUSINESS SCIENCE TECHNOLOGY SOCIETY) - RTR325LN  

11,000 Join Facebook Class-Action Lawsuit

Since Viennese law student Max Schrems filed a class-action lawsuit and petitioned U.S. and Canadian Facebook users to join him last Friday, more than 11,000 users have signed on to sue Facebook. Claimants are to expect €500, or $671, in damages if they win.

“It is much more than we expected,” Schrems told IT World(RELATED: Facebook Faces European Class-Action Lawsuit Over Privacy)

According to Schrems, Facebook has violated European privacy laws, collaborated with the NSA and has not complied with the Right to Access (among other things). (RELATED: So What Is The NSA ALLOWED To Do?)

“Our aim is to make Facebook finally operate lawfully in the area of data protection,” Schrems said in a statement. “Each additional participant also increases the pressure on Facebook.”

Well, Schrems is certainly getting what he wanted. According to IT World, 50 percent of those who have joined the class-action lawsuit are Austrian or German. It is unclear whether or not U.S. or Canadian users have signed on.

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