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U.S. President Barack Obama waves goodbye to reporters after a statement and taking questions at the White House in Washington, August 1, 2014.      REUTERS/Larry Downing (UNITED STATES  - Tags: POLITICS)   - RTR40YSI U.S. President Barack Obama waves goodbye to reporters after a statement and taking questions at the White House in Washington, August 1, 2014. REUTERS/Larry Downing (UNITED STATES - Tags: POLITICS) - RTR40YSI  

The Obama Economic Record: The Worst Five Years Since World War II

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Tracy Miller
Associate Professor, Grove City College
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      Tracy Miller

      Tracy Miller serves as associate professor of economics and director of academic testing at Grove City College. He has been teaching at Grove City College since 1995. Tracy is a fellow for economic theory and policy for The Center for Vision & Values. He received his Ph.D. in economics from the University of Chicago in 1986. He also holds a master’s degree in agricultural economics from Michigan State University and B.S. in forestry from Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University.

      Miller’s research interests include transportation policy, property rights, health economics, and environmental policy. He has published articles on agricultural policy, international trade, environmental policy, and transportation policy. He is a member of the Association of Christian Economics and serves as vice president of the Pennsylvania Economic Association. He is also on the board of advisors for the Cornwall Alliance for the Stewardship of Creation. His commentary on contemporary economic and political issues can be found at http://tracycmiller.blogspot.com/
      Miller resides in Grove City, Pennsylvania, with his wife Donna. He has five grown daughters. His hobbies include running, hiking and camping, gardening, and tennis.

In spite of the claims by President Obama’s Council of Economic Advisors regarding his administration’s economic accomplishments, the U.S. economy has grown very slowly in the years since the Great Recession of 2008-09. After four years of slow growth, the latest data reveals that the U.S. economy shrank at a 2.9 percent annual rate during the first quarter of 2014.

That figure has been widely reported, but here are some figures that have not been reported, and they are quite eye-opening:

Over the first five years of Obama’s presidency, the U.S. economy grew more slowly than during any five-year period since just after the end of World War II, averaging less than 1.3 percent per year. If we leave out the sharp recession of 1945-46 following World War II, Obama looks even worse, ranking dead last among all presidents since 1932. No other president since the Great Depression has presided over such a steadily poor rate of economic growth during his first five years in office. This slow growth should not be a surprise in light of the policies this administration has pursued.

An economy usually grows rapidly in the years immediately following a recession. As Peter Ferrera points out in Forbes, the U.S. economy has not even reached its long run average rate of growth of 3.3 percent; the highest annual growth rate since Obama took office was 2.8 percent. Total growth in real GDP over the 19 quarters of economic recovery since the second quarter of 2009 has been 10.2 percent. Growth over the same length of time during previous post-World War II recoveries has ranged from 15.1 percent during George W. Bush’s presidency to 30 percent during the recovery that began when John F. Kennedy was elected.

Economic growth is usually faster than normal following a recession as entrepreneurs find more productive ways to employ the resources that were idle during the recession. How rapidly the economy grows and recovers depends partly on whether market forces are allowed to allocate resources, including labor, to their most productive uses. Unfortunately, the Obama administration has pursued several policies that make it harder for market forces to work. These include: bailouts, expansion of entitlement programs, regulation of the economy, tax increases, and huge government deficits.

Bailouts have resulted in capital being stuck in businesses that are either inefficiently run or have failed to produce goods and services that consumers’ value highly. In the absence of bailouts, some firms would have gone bankrupt and the capital reallocated to successful firms that are producing what consumers demand in a cost-effective way.

Expansion of government entitlement programs, such as food stamps and unemployment compensation, has reduced the incentive to be employed. The average benefit per recipient of food stamps jumped by approximately 25 percent between 2007 and 2010 due to rule changes. It also became easier to qualify for food stamps. As Richard Vedder points out in a Wall Street Journal editorial, the number of food stamp recipients rose by over 7 million between 2010 and 2012, a period of falling unemployment.

A number of changes associated with the American Reinvestment and Recovery Act (the economic stimulus package passed after Obama was elected) resulted in greater after-tax benefits to being unemployed. These include exempting part of unemployment insurance benefits from federal income taxes and subsidizing health insurance costs for laid off workers. Unemployment benefits also were extended for up to 99 weeks. In addition, the federal government developed mortgage modification formulas for banks to use, which resulted in a bigger reduction in interest payments for those with lower incomes.

The combined effect of a more generous food stamp program, more generous benefits for unemployed workers and mortgage modification formulas is to offset a considerable percentage of the reduction in income from being unemployed. This results in less incentive to work. If fewer people work, less is produced and real GDP grows more slowly.