Same-Sex Rape In The Military On The Rise

David Benkof | Contributor

An article in the September issue of GQ discuses the recent increase in same-sex rape in the military. It reports, with many examples, that most victims of sexual assault in the armed forces are men, and that their rapists are nearly always other men.

Military Sexual Trauma (MST) is on the rise for both men and women, according to a Pentagon report earlier this year that was widely covered in news outlets such as the New York Times, the Washington Post, the Associated Press, Reuters, and CNN.

But virtually none of that coverage addressed an obvious aspect of the problem: the 2011 introduction of open service by gays and bisexuals undoubtedly has increased the incidence of sexual assault against men in uniform. Despite repeated LGBT assurances that integrating gays into the military would not affect morale, an uptick in same-sex rape – especially involving straight victims – most assuredly affects morale. In fact, just the fear of increased sexual violence could affect morale.

Only a fierce ideologue would suggest that introducing many thousands of same-sex-attracted men into a mostly male service would decrease or maintain the previous extent of male-male MST.

Indeed, the numbers bear that out. Male-male sexual assaults have risen each year since the repeal of the “don’t ask, don’t tell policy” that excluded “out” gays from the military. More specifically, Pentagon statistics show nearly 4,000 more male-male rapes in the year after the ban ended (2012) than the last year it was in place (2010).

Some of these instances are deeply unsettling. For example, the Killeen Daily Herald reported last month that an openly gay medic at Fort Sam Houston acknowledged that in 2012, he had a 45-minute sexual encounter with a fellow soldier who was unconscious due to his sleep medication. The medic claims he thought the interaction was consensual because he didn’t know the other soldier had taken Ambien. (“I didn’t know she passed out” would never pass muster in a campus sexual assault case.)

Astonishingly, many experts interviewed in articles on this topic, as well as gay community leaders, argue that the rapists involved are usually heterosexual. Aaron Belkin, the executive director of the Palm Center (an LGBT-funded think tank on the military and sexuality) even told the Washington Times that “very few” male-on-male perpetrators are gay.

When two reptiles have a same-sex encounter, gay activists rush to the microphones to declare “We have found gay lizards!” They proclaim Abraham Lincoln “gay” because he once shared a bed with Joshua Speed. But if a Scoutmaster has intercourse with a 15-year-old boy, or a male Marine rapes another man, those people are supposedly “not gay.”

In March, I published a report showing how gay historians and anthropologists have extensively documented being gay as a sexual orientation no more than 150 years old and originating in the West. In response, many LGBT people stated that if we know a man had sex with other men, even if he felt no gay identity or orientation, he was gay. By that standard, nearly all the male-male rapes in the military are perpetrated by gays.

Which is it? Does gay sex make you gay – or (as I believe) is sexuality far more complex than GayThink wants you to accept whenever it suits LGBT purposes?

Further, of course men claim they’re heterosexual when they’re accused of raping a man, since coming out as gay would make them appear more guilty.

Some of those interviewed in the news articles about male-male military rape resurrect the tired feminist canard that rape is about power and violence, not sex. In truth, it’s usually about all three.

Belkin compared rape in the military to prison rape. But given the prevalence of what scholars call “situational homosexuality,” many perpetrators in both settings are pursuing the only sexual outlet available, regardless of consent. In fact, this problem helps explain why transgender women are so vulnerable in prison – they’re the only women in an otherwise all-male institution.

Allyson Robinson of the Servicemembers Legal Defense Network told the Associated Press, “Sexual assault is never about sex or sexual orientation … It’s a crime of violence that’s about power and domination.” It’s never about sex? Male perpetrators often have an orgasm, but they’re not sexually excited at all? Male physiology just doesn’t work that way.

It’s not a secret that some gays are particularly attracted to straight men; some are even aroused by imagining forcing gay sex upon them. That’s easy to verify by Googling [porn straight raped] with the filter turned off. That search returns millions of unsettling hits. Of course, very few of the men who enjoy that pornography ever commit or even want to commit real-life rape. But the idea that raping men – or women — is never a sexual turn-on for the perpetrator is completely divorced from reality.

This problem doesn’t warrant returning to a restrictive policy on gays in the military. But the matter should have been discussed at length before making the change. New procedures could have anticipated the uptick in MST cases that indeed occurred. Contemptibly, some gay community leaders chose to downplay the danger in order to get the policy changed. For example, Belkin admitted to Newsweek that the gay community doesn’t “like to talk about [MST] because it makes rape look like a gay issue.”

Some of the policies that should have been implemented before “don’t ask, don’t tell” ended – and which are still necessary – include finding ways to encourage victims to come forward (as of now, only 19 percent of them do) and to convict the perpetrators when guilt can be proven (as of now, only 7 percent of MST trials end in conviction).

Many official practices to handle MST further humiliate and alienate male victims. Educational materials relating to military rape only mention male-male rape in passing, if at all. One questionnaire for victims even asks, “How many times were you violated in your vagina?” And facilities for victims of MST are generally women-only. All that needs to change.

But this episode contains another lesson. The LGBT community, which regarding marriage has shown a willingness to use deception to achieve its policy goals, must be held to a high standard of proof. Media, legislators, and voters should do their own research before trusting gay community slogans that often turn out to be misleading, incomplete, or downright false, including:

Studies prove that gay parenting is as good as straight parenting”;

Gays are born that way”;

Gay marriage won’t harm anyone”; and

Gay marriage is inevitable.”

The next time gay activists assure you their agenda has no downside, don’t trust them. Investigate it for yourself.

David Benkof is a freelance writer living in St. Louis and a frequent contributor to the Daily Caller. Follow him on Facebook or E-mail him at DavidBenkof@gmail.com.

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