Politics

EXCLUSIVE: From Batman To Pac-Man, Scott Walker Talks About Growing Up In Wisconsin

PHILADELPHIA — Wisconsin Gov. Scott Walker does not have a favorite television show. He’s too busy exploring a run for the presidency.

“I saw the [Chicago] Blackhawks win. For a couple of nights I got to watch the NBA championship. If I have time, and it’s usually taped, my wife likes to watch Dancing With The Stars,” noting that both were fans of American Idol for years but that the last couple of seasons have not been as exciting.

The young governor indicated to The Daily Caller on Saturday during an in depth interview at Philadelphia’s Downtown Sheraton Hotel, that his schedule leaves little time to watch television these days, so he opts for sports programming, when he finds viewing time.

In the meantime, the 47-year old Walker delivers speeches at Republican-focused events, grassroots-activist venues, and intimate fundraisers with high dollar donors, among other activities. Polling shows Walker as part of a three-way tie as the top spot candidate with Florida Sen. Marco Rubio and former Florida Gov. Jeb Bush in the last few weeks, so responses to the press on policy as well as personal seem almost safe.

Scott Walker _ Sarah Barth _ Daily Caller 36

Walker Rolls On His Road King 

If Walker is not telling audiences about why he chose to run for governor, a decision he often explains was motivated by a concern of what the future held for his sons, or meeting with a potential donor like David Koch, he takes time to ride on his 2003 Harley Davidson Road King.

Walker learned to ride the 1450 cc twin cam 88 road hog when he was Milwaukee’s county executive 12 years ago. At the height of the labor-union protests in Madison that made Walker a national figure during his state’s budget debate, he told the local Fox affiliate his rides are his escape. He prefers to ride alone at night a few times a week during the summer, a thrill he will likely have to give up or at least greatly modify if he becomes the next president of the United States.

Staying In Shape

However, Walker will not have to give up his other past times should he make it to the Oval Office. He enjoys playing basketball with his teenage sons Matt and Alex as well as taking long runs. The governor appears to keep himself physically fit, telling TheDC he regularly exercises during his travels, drinks lots of water and stays away from soda.

In fact, Walker and some of his traveling staff wear fit bits and compete with one another over the number of steps each has taken. The Wisconsin Republican does not golf, unlike President Obama and past U.S. presidents, saying he enjoys camping or hiking instead.

“I like camping. My parents are wonderful people, but my dad wasn’t an outdoors kind of guy, so I got my love for the outdoors from scouts, so I still like it. If I get camping somewhere, I’ll go and hike. Those are enjoyable times.”

Walker’s Family Establishes Themselves In America

Scott Kevin Walker was born on Nov. 2, 1967 in Colorado Springs to Llewellyn Scott “Llew” and Patricia Ann “Pat” Walker. The eldest of two sons, the soon to be governor of Wisconsin was raised in the small town of Delavan by his Baptist minister father and bookkeeper mother.

The Badger State Republican regularly ditches speaker podiums during his remarks to large venues and strolls around stages with rolled up shirtsleeves. He relishes telling audiences that his family history is an illustration of American hard work and morality.

“My grandparents on my mom’s side — they were farmers. They didn’t have indoor plumbing on the farm until my mom went off to junior high school,” he said to attendees at the Northeast Republican Leadership Conference on Saturday.

Walker noted that his great-great grandparents came to Philadelphia, where he gave his speech that day, from south-central Wales during the 1800’s. His great-great grandfather, whose own father was a miner, found work at a local factory as a blacksmith.

“They had four children — two boys and two girls and then they eventually moved to the big west just like people did in those days and they had five more daughters on top of that,” he said.

The family eventually moved to Concorde, Ill. Walker calls it “one of those great American success stories.”

“When I think about my family, I think about my parents my grandparents and the story of my great-great grandfather. My brother and I did not come from fame or fortune. But we got something more important,” he said. “We got the belief that if you work hard and you play by the rules, you can do and be anything you want in America. That’s the American dream.”