Elections

Huckabee Compares Kentucky Clerk Who Didn’t Get Bail To Serial Killers Who Did

Republican presidential candidate Mike Huckabee argues that the jailing of a Kentucky clerk for refusing to issue gay marriage licenses is proof that there is a “criminalization of Christianity” occurring in America.

Huckabee, appearing on Fox News’s “America’s Newsroom” with Martha MacCallum Wednesday, said that, “Jeffrey Dahmer got bail, Albert DeSalvo, the Boston Strangler got bail, John Wayne Gacy got bail. Kim Davis [the Kentucky clerk], because she followed her convictions is put in jail, and is not given bail.”

Martha MacCallum: You have a rally next Tuesday at 3:00 for Kim Davis. You are very supportive of her. Why?

Mike Huckabee: Because, this is the criminalization of Christianity. What she did was follow the Kentucky Constitution, voted on by 75% of the people. She has now been criminalized. She’s being held without bail. I want you to think about this. Jeffrey Dahmer got bail, Albert DeSalvo, the Boston Strangler got bail, John Wayne Gacy got bail. Kim Davis because she followed her convictions is put in jail and is not given bail. This is an unbelievable moment in American history and I think it may wake people up. Because who is next, are pastors next, florists, caterers, who else goes to jail before this is over? And the Supreme Court reached out of thin air and created a redefinition of marriage. There is no authorization from the Congress. The president has never signed a bill that enabled this idea of same sex marriage. And I think it is interested in Tennessee, judge dismissed a divorce case, he said, if the court doesn’t think the people of Tennessee are smart enough to know when a marriage starts and what it looks like, then I guess the court doesn’t give us enough sense to know how to end one. So he dismissed the divorce case.  The implications of this are extraordinarily far reaching and that is why we will be in Kentucky, on Tuesday 3:00 to rally for Kim Davis and to rally for religious liberty. And most importantly, to rally for there to be consistency in the law.

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