World

Russia Accused Of Slipping US Diplomats Date Rape Drugs During Anti-Corruption Conference

Two U.S. diplomats were allegedly drugged in Russia while attending an international conference last year.

One of the officials had to go to the hospital, according to Radio Free Europe/Radio Liberty (RFE/RL). But while the official was there giving blood and tissue samples, the electricity at the Western medical clinic went off and staff were incapable of doing the appropriate testing.

By the time the officials left the country for medical treatment it was too late to collect the samples, a U.S. official told RFE/RL.

Investigators believe that the two American ambassadors (one male and one female) were likely slipped some sort of “date rape” drug at a bar in the St. Petersburg hotel in which many officials were staying.

Russian authorities requested proof that the person was drugged, but the U.S. cannot definitively prove it due to lack of proper examination.

Investigators even tried to obtain the official records for hotel personnel, including clock-in hours, but managers at the hotel said no such records exist for that time period.

The diplomats were visiting St. Petersburg for the Conference of the States Parties to the United Nations Convention against Corruption. There were 21 American officials from various agencies present at the conference, including the Department of State, Department of Justice, and the Bureau for International Narcotics and Law Enforcement Affairs.

The meeting in Russia was the first time since 2014 that the U.S. was allowed to send representatives when the U.S. and other nations levied sanctions on the country for its occupation of the Crimea Peninsula in Ukraine.

The alleged spiking of U.S. officials’ drinks is yet another incident of apparent Russia harassment.

Operatives in Russia are also accused of slashing visitors’ tires.

A Russian spy was reported to have broken into a U.S. diplomat’s house, subsequently defecating on the carpet in the living room.

Russian secret agents also have been blamed for breaking into the houses of American officials and turning off all the electronics in order to flex its muscle and showcase ostensible Russian power. In one such case, an operative killed the dog of an American defense attache.

Such incidents and an already tumultuous U.S. relationship with Russia are presumably why the Department of State’s Bureau of Consular Affairs provides warnings for Americans traveling to Russia.

“Foreigners may become victims of harassment, mistreatment, and extortion by law-enforcement and other officials,” the advisory reads.

“Police do not need to show probable cause in order to stop, question, or detain individuals,” the bureau warns.

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