Entertainment

Therapist Breaks Down Trend Of Celebrities Allegedly Masturbating In Front Of Women

In the past month, two major celebrities have been accused of masturbating in front of women.

Film mogul Harvey Weinstein was accused by multiple women of this behavior.

“He returned in a robe with the front open, buck-naked. He told me to keep talking about my film and that he was going to get into his hot tub which was in the room adjacent to his office, steps away. I kept talking as he got into the hot tub. When I finished my pitch, he asked me to watch him masturbate,” actress Louisette Geiss said during a press conference.

Comedian Louis C.K. also allegedly masturbated in front of several women, according to a bombshell New York Times report Thursday.

He allegedly took two comedians back to his hotel room and asked if he could take out his penis. “He proceeded to take all of his clothes off, and get completely naked, and started masturbating,” Dana Min Goodman told the Times.

James Olsen, a therapist that specializes in sex addiction, told The Daily Caller Thursday that the accusations “generally fit within the framework of exhibitionism.”

“For many, the thought of being seen and wanted sexually is erotic and stimulating. This is not always pathological, but when it rises to the level of offense behavior, it gives rise to very serious clinical concerns. Many exposers experience significant struggles with their self-esteem and the search to be seen and wanted has often become a powerful drug for them,” Olsen told TheDC.

“Exposers are often highly compulsive in their sexual behavior and gaining control of their exposing can be difficult, even for those who desperately want to stop,” Olsen continued. “The act of exposing is also highly risky and engaging in such a brazen act tends to result in a massive dose of adrenaline being injected into the blood stream. For some, this sensation adds to their high and when mixed with the other sexually gratifying elements of the behavior, can have the effect of a uniquely intoxicating cocktail of stimulation, anticipation, and excitement.”

Touching on the celebrity status of these accused men, Olsen said: “It is fair to hypothesize that individuals in positions of power and notoriety may be more likely to receive the response they desire than would the average person. Some may comply out of a desire to fulfill their own fantasy of being close with such a person. Others may respond in the way the perpetrator desires out of fear, shock, or a hesitancy to confront a powerful or influential person.”

Former Fox News host Bill O’Reilly and Louis C.K. were both also accused of masturbating while on the phone.

“I have treated many clients who have masturbated while talking on the phone with others, often believing (rightly or wrongly) that the person on the other end was unsuspecting of their sexual activities,” the therapist stated. “This too is a form of sexual assault, in that the other person has not consented to be used for sexual gratification, regardless of their awareness of the activity. The person engaged in masturbation while on the phone with a seemingly unsuspecting person is likely to experience a rush from the experience.”

“They are covertly engaging in sexual activity with the person on the other end of the phone. The risk of being caught is akin to the rush someone might feel from having sex in a public place, but there is more. The close proximity of the person on the other end of the phone can create a faux intimacy that feels gratifying for them in the moment, despite its superficial nature,” Olsen continued.

Weinstein has since entered a sex addiction rehab facility, and Olsen said that he has treated clients who have overcome their struggles.