US

JFK Files: US Contemplated Fake Soviet Attack To Provoke War

The U.S. government considered manufacturing or obtaining Soviet aircraft in order to launch an attack on American or friendly bases that could then provide an excuse for war, according to newly released documents.

The documents are part of an October release of thousands of formerly classified files related to the assassination of John F. Kennedy. It describes a March 22, 1962 meeting that discussed “the question raised by the attorney general on the possibility of U.S. manufacture or acquisition of Soviet aircraft.”

The meeting was held by the “Special Group (Augmented),” which according to an encyclopedia on the Central Intelligence Agency, included Attorney General Robert Kennedy, CIA Director John McCone, National Security Advisor McGeorge Bundy and chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff Lyman Lemnitzer. And while not members, President Kennedy and Secretary of State Dean Rusk would attend meetings.

The previously top secret documents listed three reasons for obtaining or manufacturing the aircraft.

“There is a possibility that such aircraft could be used in a deception operation designed to confuse enemy planes in the air, to launch a surprise attack against enemy installations or in a provocation operation in which Soviet aircraft would appear to attack U.S. or friendly installations in order to provide an excuse for U.S. intervention.”

The notion of using fake Soviet aircraft in a so-called “false flag” attack was first revealed in Robert Dallek’s “An Unfinished Life: John F. Kennedy, 1917-1963,” which was released in 2001. Dallek’s book says that the idea to manufacture or obtain Soviet aircraft was suggested by CIA Director McCone, however, the released documents say it was raised by Attorney General Kennedy.

The release of JFK assassination documents has produced other evidence of American government plots to use violence to create a pretext for war.

The Miami New Times reported in October that the CIA contemplated developing a “Communist Cuban terror campaign.”

“We could develop a Communist Cuban terror campaign in the Miami area, in other Florida cities and even in Washington. The terror campaign could be pointed at Cuban refugees seeking haven in the United States,” an April 1962 report sent by Gen. Edward Landsdale to Gen. Maxwell Taylor said. “Exploding a few plastic bombs in carefully chosen spots, the arrest of a Cuban agent and the release of prepared documents substantiating Cuban involvement also would be helpful in projecting the idea of an irresponsible government.”