US

‘Dismantle Whiteness’ Poster Causing Backlash On USC Campus

A recently installed mural on the University Of Southern California’s campus is causing controversy after it called to “dismantle whiteness.”

The banner, which reads “DISMANTLE WHITENESS AND MISOGYNY ON THIS CAMPUS,” was installed under a highly frequented archway near the school’s Annenberg School for Communication and Journalism. It is intended to start a conversation about tolerance and raise awareness for “racism, sexism and xenophobia,” its masterminds say.

The masterminds behind the poster are USC’s Institute for Diversity and Empowerment (IDEA), students in a course called “Women: Designing Media for Social Change,” and social change advocacy group “When Women Disrupt.” These people sound like a great time.

It’s pretty surprising that it took not one, not two, but three groups partnered together to create a seven word poster with a ludicrous message.

It’s also pretty ironic that this message is supposed to encourage diversity when it’s straight up calling for the dismantling of an entire race.

When pressed on the issue, a communications professor told the College Fix “The installation is intended to spark dialogue. To that end, the signage is meant to offer grounding of terms and ideas. There is no expectation that everyone agree with the statement offered by the artists, but hopefully viewers can acknowledge the experience of peers on campus around these issues.”

Imagine for just a moment if this sign advocated for the downfall of any other race. I highly doubt this professor – or anybody else on campus – would defend the sentiment. Flagrantly conflating a race with misogyny is not an educational exercise. It’s a misinformation campaign.

It’s one thing to advocate for equality. But you venture into some very muddy, very dangerous territory when entire movements and institutions vilify an entire race in the name of fairness. Racism and misogyny can happen everywhere, no matter the content of melanin in your skin.

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