The Daily Caller

The Daily Caller
US President Barack Obama speaks about the Internal Revenue Service (IRS) in the East Room of the White House in Washington, DC, May 15, 2013. AFP PHOTO / Saul LOEB        (Photo credit should read SAUL LOEB/AFP/Getty Images) US President Barack Obama speaks about the Internal Revenue Service (IRS) in the East Room of the White House in Washington, DC, May 15, 2013. AFP PHOTO / Saul LOEB (Photo credit should read SAUL LOEB/AFP/Getty Images)  

Obama to push climate plan as Senate grapples with immigration controversy

Photo of Neil Munro
Neil Munro
White House Correspondent

President Barack Obama is about to launch a new high-profile “climate change” initiative, according to a personally-signed Sunday tweet from the White House’s Twitter account.

“We owe it to our kids to do something about climate change. Share this video and join me Tuesday … –bo,” the tweet reads.

The tweet included a link to a short video, in which Obama touts the impending initiative, but the president offered no details on the plan’s goals, costs or spending.

“This Tuesday, I’ll lay out my vision for where I believe we need to go — a national plan to reduce carbon pollution, prepare our country for the impacts of climate change and lead global efforts to fight it,” Obama said in the video.

The Washington Post reported that the plan will include promise regulations to force down carbon-dioxide emissions from power plants. Those rules likely will drive up the cost of electricity.

The planned June 25 speech at Georgetown University is one of a series of high-profile media events that the president’s team scheduled for June and July.

This week, he attended a G8 summit in Ireland and travelled to Berlin to give an outdoor speech to several thousand invited guests on the landmark Brandenburg Gate.

Next week, starting on June 26, he and his wife will travel through telegenic spots in Africa for six days.

The Africa trip will keep him — and much media coverage — outside Washington D.C., where his allies in the Senate are trying to push through an controversial bill that would double the immigration rate for the next 20 years.

The details of the immigration bill are very unpopular. In 2007, last-minute public protests derailed a similar effort.

On Monday, Senators are expected to vote on a critical cloture vote to end debate on the 1,200-page bill, prior to a final up-or-down majority vote by June 27.