Politics
Senate Budget Committee chairman Senator Patty Murray (D-WA) (R) and House Budget Committee chairman Representative Paul Ryan (R-WI) hold a news conference to introduce The Bipartisan Budget Act of 2013 at the U.S. Capitol in Washington, December 10, 2013. REUTERS/Jonathan Ernst Senate Budget Committee chairman Senator Patty Murray (D-WA) (R) and House Budget Committee chairman Representative Paul Ryan (R-WI) hold a news conference to introduce The Bipartisan Budget Act of 2013 at the U.S. Capitol in Washington, December 10, 2013. REUTERS/Jonathan Ernst  

Ryan-Murray budget deal hikes air travel security tax by 124 percent

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Vince Coglianese
Executive Editor
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      Vince Coglianese

      Vince Coglianese is the executive editor of The Daily Caller.

      His reporting has received wide coverage, including in the pages of The New York Times, the Wall Street Journal, The Washington Post and The Drudge Report, among others. Vince has appeared as a guest on the Fox News Channel, CNN and CNBC, as well as other cable news networks. Additionally, Vince has been a guest on "The Sean Hannity Radio Show," Sirius XM''s "The Press Pool with Julie Mason," "The Schnitt Show" and Glenn Beck's TheBlaze TV.

      Prior to joining TheDC, Vince was the Web Editor for CarolinaCoastOnline.com, and a radio talk show host for The Talk Station (WTKF/WJNC) in Morehead City, N.C.

The newly-released budget deal between Democratic Sen. Patty Murray and Republican Rep. Paul Ryan will hike the aviation security fee paid by air travelers by 124 percent, if passed.

Murray and Ryan settled on an agreement that would hit air travelers with a fee of $5.60 per one-way flight — or $11.20 for a round-trip excursion.

That’s 60 cents higher than the $5.00 fee the Department of Homeland Security requested, and represents a huge jump up from the current $2.50 minimum security fee.

Ryan had reportedly backed a $5.00 maximum fee during the budget negotiations.

DHS has been desperate for a fee increase to cover what the agency feels is a massive budgetary shortfall for the Transportation Security Agency, with current security fees covering only about 25 percent — or $1.9 billion — of the TSA’s $7.5 billion annual costs.

But the Ryan-Murray deal doesn’t earmark the new revenue for TSA. Instead, the funds will be deposited into the “general fund of the Treasury,” where they are supposed to help partially rollback the sequester and offset the automatic spending cuts set to begin in January.

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