Politics

Cruz, Cassidy Introduce Resolution Condemning Antifa As ‘Domestic Terrorist Organization’

Photo Credit: (Photo by Jonathan Bachman/Getty Images), Photographer: Al Drago/Bloomberg via Getty Images

Republican Sens. Bill Cassidy of Louisiana and Ted Cruz of Texas introduced a resolution Thursday condemning the far-left group antifa as a “domestic terrorist organization.”

The resolution comes after conservative journalist Andy Ngo was brutally beaten last month while covering an antifa rally in Portland. (RELATED: Andy Ngo Makes CNN Appearance After Antifa Assault)

“Antifa are terrorists, violent masked bullies who ‘fight fascism’ with actual fascism, protected by Liberal privilege, ” Cassidy said in a press release.

Cruz echoed those sentiments, calling members of the organization “hateful, intolerant radicals.”

“Antifa is a terrorist organization composed of hateful, intolerant radicals who pursue their extreme agenda through aggressive violence,” Cruz said.

Andy Ngo, a Portland-based journalist, is seen covered in unknown substance after unidentified Rose City Antifa members attacked him on June 29, 2019 in Portland, Oregon. (Moriah Ratner/Getty Images)

Andy Ngo, a Portland-based journalist, is seen covered in unknown substance after unidentified Rose City Antifa members attacked him on June 29, 2019 in Portland, Oregon. (Moriah Ratner/Getty Images)

Cruz added that the intention of the resolution is to call for antifa to be designated as a domestic terrorist organization. (RELATED: Ted Cruz Fires Back At Jim Carrey Over Attacking Covington Kids)

“Like any terrorist organization they choose to pursue their political ends through violence, fear and intimidation,” Cruz said. “They must be stopped. I am proud to introduce this resolution with Senator Cassidy to properly identify what Antifa are: domestic terrorists.”

Antifa has been particularly active in Ngo’s home city of Portland, which is now looking for ways to crack down on the militant organization. Portland police chief Danielle Outlaw called for a ban Thursday on the wearing of masks during protests, saying that forcing protesters to show their face would make them less emboldened.

“A lot of people are emboldened because they know they can’t be identified,” Outlaw said.