Editorial

Rachel Hill Defends Standing For The National Anthem As The Rest Of The Chicago Red Stars Kneeled

Rachel Hill (Photo by Alex Goodlett/Getty Images)

David Hookstead Smoke Room Editor-in-Chief
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Chicago Red Stars soccer player Rachel Hill has released a statement defending her decision to stand during the national anthem.

This past Saturday, her team decided to take a knee prior to a game against the Washington Spirit, but Hill went ultra-viral for deciding to stand during the anthem. (RELATED: David Hookstead Is The True King In The North When It Comes To College Football)

Hill, who said she supports Black Lives Matter, released a statement late Tuesday night on Instagram about the situation, and stated in part:

When I stood for the national anthem before the Chicago Red Stars’ most recent game, this was a decision that did not come easily or without profound thought. Before the game, I was completely torn on what to do. I spoke with friends, family and teammates — of all races, religions and backgrounds — with the hope of guidance. I chose to stand because of what the flag inherently means to my military family members and me, but I 100% support my peers.

You can read her full statement below.

 

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This is where we’re now at in America. We’re now at the point in 2020 where if you stand and don’t take a knee, then you have to explain yourself.

Hill has absolutely nothing to explain or apologize for. This is America. In this country, you should respect the flag and stand.

 

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When you do stand for the anthem, it shouldn’t become a national issue. For some reason, people seem to forget what this country is all about.

Hill didn’t do anything wrong, she has nothing to explain, she damn sure doesn’t have anything to apologize for and it’s that simple.

 

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It’s so frustrating that we’re back at a point in America where the anthem has turned into a lightning rod for debate. It’s dumb and not necessary.